Last edited by Faunris
Wednesday, May 13, 2020 | History

3 edition of Slavery and the domestic slave-trade in the United States. found in the catalog.

Slavery and the domestic slave-trade in the United States.

Andrews, E. A.

Slavery and the domestic slave-trade in the United States.

In a series of letters addressed to the Executive committee of the American union for the relief and improvement of the colored race.

by Andrews, E. A.

  • 56 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Light and Stearns in Boston .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States,
  • United States.,
  • Maryland.,
  • Washington (D.C.),
  • Virginia.
    • Subjects:
    • Slaves -- United States -- Social conditions.,
    • Slave-trade -- United States.,
    • Slavery -- Maryland.,
    • Slavery -- Washington (D.C.),
    • Slavery -- Virginia.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementBy Prof. E. A. Andrews.
      ContributionsAmerican Union for the Relief and Improvement of the Colored Race.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsE449 .A56
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxii, [9]-201p.
      Number of Pages201
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6529360M
      LC Control Number11007592
      OCLC/WorldCa989148

        By Calvin Schermerhorn, African American Intellectual History Society — This is an excerpt from Calvin Schermerhorn’s Unrequited Toil: A History of United States Slavery (Cambridge University Press, ). This excerpt has been reprinted with permission. African-descended Americans bore the social costs of paid several times over, in fact. The history of slavery spans many cultures, nationalities, and religions from ancient times to the present day. However the social, economic, and legal positions of slaves have differed vastly in different systems of slavery in different times and places. Slavery occurs relatively rarely among hunter-gatherer populations because it develops under conditions of social stratification.

      This “domestication of the slave trade” was one of the most important social, economic and political transformations in the United States from the Revolution to Civil War. It greatly contributed to the consolidation and expansion of slavery during an era fraught with dangers for slaveowners in North America. 5 The Domestic Slave Trade in America; 6 The Interregional Slave Trade in the History and Myth-Making of the U.S. South; 7 Reconsidering the Internal Slave Trade; 8 “Cuffy,” “Fancy Maids,” and “One-Eyed Men” 9 Grapevine in the Slave Market; 10 The Fragmentation of Atlantic Slavery and the British Intercolonial Slave Trade.

      Though Congress outlawed the African slave trade in , domestic slave trade flourished, and the slave population in the US nearly tripled over the next 50 years. The domestic trade continued into the s and displaced approximately million men, women, and children, the vast majority of whom were born in America. Title:: Slavery and the Domestic Slave Trade, in the United States: Author:: Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends: Note: Philadelphia: Merrihew and Thompson,


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Slavery and the domestic slave-trade in the United States by Andrews, E. A. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Inthe U.S. Congress abolished the foreign slave trade, a ban that went into effect on January 1, After this date, importing slaves from Africa became illegal in the United States.

While smuggling continued to occur, the end of the international slave trade meant that domestic slaves were in very high demand. This book, "Slavery and the domestic slave-trade in the United States. In a series of letters addressed to the Executive committee of the American union for the relief and improvement of the colored race", by Andrews, E.

(Ethan Allen), ,American Union for the Relief and Improvement of the Colored Race, is a replication of a book originally published before Author: E. Andrews. Slavery and the Domestic Slave-trade in the United States: In a Series of Letters Addressed to the E [Ethan Allen Andrews] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

This is a pre historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the. The domestic slave trade, also known as the Second Middle Passage and the interregional slave trade, was the term for the domestic trade of slaves within the United States that reallocated slaves across states during the antebellum was most significant in the early to midth century, when historians estimate one million slaves were taken in a forced migration from the.

The domestic slave trade became extremely profitable as demand rose with the expansion of cultivation in the Deep South for cotton and sugar cane crops. Slavery in the United States became, more or less, self-sustaining by natural increase among the.

The Domestic Slave Trade The Louisiana Purchase in and the new economic boom in the cotton and sugar industries provoked the Great Migration to the New South.

Thousands of planters moved from the Old South to the lower Mississippi River, leaving behind lands impoverished by more than a century of one-crop agriculture. Slavery and the domestic slave-trade in the United States.

In a series of letters addressed to the Executive committee of the American union for the relief and improvement of the colored race by Andrews, E. (Ethan Allen), ; American Union for the Relief and Improvement of the Colored RacePages: Slavery and the domestic slave trade, in the United States.

Philadelphia, Printed by Merrihew and Thompson, (OCoLC) Material Type: Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends.

OCLC Number: Description: 46 pages ; Slavery in America: The Montgomery Slave Trade documents American slavery and Montgomery’s prominent role in the domestic slave trade.

The report is part of EJI’s project focused on developing a more informed understanding of America’s racial history and how it relates to contemporary challenges. Get this from a library. Slavery and the domestic slave-trade in the United States; in a series of letters addressed to the Executive Committee of the American Union for the Relief and Improvement of the Colored Race.

[E A Andrews; American Union for the Relief and Improvement of the Colored Race.]. Slavery in what became the United States probably began with the arrival of "20 and odd" enslaved Africans to the British colony of Virginia, in It officially ended with the ratification of the 13th Amendment in Use our timeline to navigate a.

Slavery and the Domestic Slave-Trade in the United States, ISBNISBNLike New Used, Free shipping in the USSeller Rating: % positive. Slavery and the domestic slave-trade in the United States.

In a series of letters addressed to the Executive committee of the American union for the relief and improvement of the colored race. Andrews View preview. 0 reviews Add review.

Slavery and the Domestic Slave-trade in the United States In A Series of Letters Addressed to the Executive Committee of the American Union for the Relief and Improvement of the Colored Race (Book): Andrews, E.

The Domestic Slave Trade Overview. The domestic slave trade within the United States did not begin, as is often assumed, with the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade in It originated half a century earlier in the s, and overlapped with the trade from Africa.

pervision, slavery exists in all its abomination. In Washington, our capital city, there is a market for the sale and purchase of human beings. There too is a depot for -those, who are enga- ged in the domestic slave-trade, an infernal traffic which is car- ried on in.

More importantly, more than one million slaves were transported in a forced migration in the domestic slave trade, from the Upper South to the Deep South, most by slave traders—either overland where they were held for days in chained coffles, or by the coastwise trade and ships.

The majority of slaves in the Deep South, men and women, worked. In Pres. Thomas Jefferson signed legislation that officially ended the African slave trade beginning in January However, this act did not presage the end of slavery.

Rather, it spurred the growth of the domestic slave trade in the United States, especially as a source of labour for the new cotton lands in the Southern interior.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Slavery and the Domestic Slave-Trade in the United States: In a Series of Letters Addressed to the E by Ethan Allen Andrews (, Hardcover) at the best online prices at eBay.

Free shipping for many products. The author then lists the components of American slavery which resembles little of the ancient systems thus illustrating the horrific institution of the present day.

The pamphlet cites specific stories about the institution in the United States and also condemns it. The domestic slave trade brought misery, separating families and increasing the climate of insecurity in the community Distributed the African-American population throughout the South in a migration that greatly surpassed in volume the transatlantic slave trade in North America.About this Book Catalog Record Details.

Slavery and the domestic slave-trade in the United States. Andrews, E. A. (Ethan Allen), View full catalog record. Rights: Public Domain, Google-digitized.Slavery and the domestic slave-trade in the United States In a series of letters addressed to the Executive committee of the American union for the relief and improvement of the colored race.

Boston, Light and Stearns, Web.